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Performance


2003  "Katsujinken"
Hahamongha Park, Pasadena, CA
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Katsujinken Site

Annabelle Aylmer and Karen Bonfigli presented a performance for the Trailmarkers: One mile of Art, produced by Newtown of Pasadena, which was held in the Hahamongha Park in the North Pasadena/Arroyo area.

Katsujinken: one meaning of which is “The sword that protects”.

Conceived during the bombing/invasion of Iraq, we struggled with notions of violence, the need for it, if it is to protect one’s community, and gratuitous, which we felt the Iraq invasion was; and our personal sense of betrayal by our government, which elicited enormous feelings of violence within our hearts.

'Aikido' can be translated as the "way of harmonious spirit". The goal of the training is to manage the ki of a physical conflict in a controlled way, disabling your opponent by harmonizing your energy. Karen Bonfigli practiced Aikido for over 5 years. Butoh is a dance form that originated in Japan in 1959 as a response by the subsequent generation of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings, and the resultant sense of death Katsujinken Onlookers and disfigurement. It contorts traditions from Noh and Kabuki theater, reflecting a visceral expression of the ultimate struggle of life. Aylmer spent time practicing these dance moves, working and performing with Corpus Delicti during 2003. Blending these two traditions, they created a local space in Hahamongha Park from which they emerged to perform along the mile of other installations and performances, periodically chanting Japanese tongue twisters to the sounds of vibrating brass bowls.

(uraniwa niwa niwa niwa niwa niwa niwatori ga iru)
(which actually refers to chickens)



Katsujinken Performance

Katsujinken Performance

Katsujinken Aylmer

Katsujinken Aylmer